College at Home 101

February 28, 2014 | Posted in Informative, Preparing for College | By

By Alyssa Mulhearn

 

Bachelor’s degree is a term that, for many, conjures ideas of financial security, job opportunities, and a road to success. It’s the $60,000-plus price tag and four years that make people wonder if it’s really worth it.

As homeschoolers, you already realize that education is not confined to a classroom. “Distance education” and “online learning” have become viable, popular options in post-secondary education. So, how can you make these new technological education tools work for you?

The first two years of a bachelor’s degree are typically dedicated to general education requirements. These are courses that cover the basic educational building blocks: math, English, history, science, etc. High school graduates have already studied these courses. What if you could prove you already know the information by passing a test, like a final exam, and get college credit for it? The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST) offer you just that opportunity.

The College Board, the organization that brought us theSAT, has also created CLEP exams. A CLEP test is essentially a final exam for one of the thirty-three different subjects offered. When you pass one of their multiple-choice exams, College Board awards you the same amount of credit as if you had taken the entire course. In exchange for $80 and taking one 90-minute exam, you can earn three to twelve credits that are accepted at more than 2,900 colleges.      Read more →

Does Homeschooling Leave You Stuck at Home?

February 27, 2014 | Posted in Encouragement, Informative, Just For Fun | By

Homeschooling can offer your kids a myriad of educational life experiences.

The Basics:[1]
Over 1.5 million kids
Or 3% of all kids
Are homeschooled.

84% received all education at home[1]
11% go to school <9 hours a week
5% go to school from 9-25 hours a week

But that doesn’t mean they’re trapped at home.
They’re busy doing some cool things.

Reasons for homeschooling:[1]
36% Religious or moral instruction
21% Concern about school environment (safety, drugs, negative peer pressure)
17% dissatisfaction with academic instruction
14% Other reasons (family time, finances, travel, distance)
7% Want to provide a non-traditional approach to education
6% health problems or special needs

In general homeschooled kids are smart:      Read more →

Piggy Bank Principles

February 26, 2014 | Posted in Encouragement, Informative, Parenting, Single Parents | By

 

By Gabriella Smith

“I have a lot of money!” My 5-year-old brother exclaimed, as he excitedly dumped out his piggy bank earlier today. Turns out he only had about $3.65. It makes me laugh, thinking of how people’s perceptions of money change as they get older.

Back in my early days, money had two purposes: you spent it or you saved it (or tried to save it and usually ended up spending it on something smaller). I remember the time I had the grand idea that my younger sister would get a watch that came in a cereal box while we “jointly” saved to buy me a new watch. I had forgotten about it by the next day, which, I think, was a good thing. Now that I’m not 7 any more, I see the unfairness of such an economic endeavor.

When I was 7 or 8, I would buy small things as soon as I got my hands on any money. Then, as I got older, my interests changed but not my spending philosophy, as you’ll soon see. I started to be a bit smarter with my money around the age of 12, learning about a whole new element of spending.

My parents have always taught me and modeled for me the importance of good money management—things such as being generous, choosing purchases wisely, and saving my money. However, it wasn’t until a few years ago that I seriously started to manage my money.      Read more →

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