Getting Started

1. What do I need to do to begin home schooling?

Answer: Fill out and turn in a notice of intent and waiver form to your local public school superintendent. Click here for more information on how to home school.

2. Where do I get books to home school my child?

Answer: There are numerous places where you can order books. Click here for a list of home school resources.

3. Are there any restrictions on which parents can home school their child?

Answer: Unless you are a registered sex offender, you can home school your child in Arkansas. Home school curricula are tailored to enable individuals without teaching degrees to be very successful home schoolers.

4. Does the State of Arkansas oversee my home school?

Answer: No. Home school parents sign a Notice of Intent and Waiver form notifying the state of their intent to home school and waiving the state of any responsibility over the education of their children.

5. Does the State of Arkansas require any specific home school curriculum?

Answer: No.

6. Does the State of Arkansas require any certain number of home school hours per day or days per year?

Answer: No.

7. Does the State of Arkansas require the parent to have any particular level of education in order to home school?

Answer: No.

8. How can I make contact with other home schoolers in my area of the state?

Answer: Over 70 home school support groups cover most of the state. Click here for a list.

9. Does the State of Arkansas require me to keep any particular set of home school records such as test scores and etc?

Answer: No. However, it is a good idea to keep a record of work done by your home school student in case anyone were to ever question the quality of education you are providing in your home school.

10. Does the State of Arkansas require my home school student to take any mandated tests?

Answer: No, Act 832 of 2015 recently repealed Home School Testing.  Parents are no longer required to test their students.

11. If I register my home school child for a certain grade do I have to limit my curriculum to that specific grade?

Answer: No. One positive aspect of home schooling is that parents can tailor the curriculum to meet the needs of the child. This means that parents have the freedom to enroll their child in subjects from more than one grade level at the same time.

12. Can home school students skip grades or be held back?

Answer: Yes.

13. Can home school students start school a year late?

Answer: Yes.

14. Do home schoolers have to enroll in kindergarten at the same age as public school students?

Answer: No. By turning in a kindergarten waiver form to the local public school district, parents may waive kindergarten for their child.

15. Can a grandparent or someone other than the parent home school a child?

Answer: The letter of the law says that a home school must be conducted primarily by the child’s parent or legal guardian. No court rulings exist that clarify to what extent other individuals can be involved in teaching a child enrolled in a home school.

16. Can a home school declare itself to be a private school and avoid state home school regulation?

Answer: An Arkansas court ruling from the 1980’s stated that a home school could not be a private school. No other rulings exist on this matter?

17. How much does it cost to home school a student for one school year?

Answer: There is no set answer to this question. It is less expensive to teach a kindergarten student than one in high school. Some parents supplement their child’s education with online classes on the internet. Some buy used books and others buy new ones. Some people borrow books and others utilize resources from their public library. As a general rule, parents can expect to spend around $200 per year per child on books.

18. Does the State of Arkansas provide any books or other material for home schoolers?

Answer: No.

19. Can public school superintendents require parents to interview with him before being allowed to home school?

Answer: No.

20. Can public school superintendents require proof of residence before accepting home school notices of intent?

Answer: No.

21. Do parents who are transferring their child from a public school to a home school have to tell the superintendent why they are transferring?

Answer: No.

Child Development

1. What about the socialization of my child?

Answer: Numerous opportunities for socialization exist outside of schools. Home school students can take advantage of these. Also, home school students are spared some of the negative socialization that goes on at a traditional school.

2. Will my child’s development be affected if he or she has little contact with other children?

Answer: Isolating a child is not good. Most home school students are afforded sufficient time to play with other children through organized home school activities, church, scouting, or through friends and family. In addition, home school students have a greater opportunity to learn to relate to adults.

Page 1 of 3 | Next page